Being a Not So Stay-At-Home Mom

This was it. My life dream was about to be fulfilled. Me. Brooke Norton. A stay at home mom. As scared as I was to be completely on my own with Evan for the first time, I was excited to enter into this new season of life. Me and my guy, all day, every day. We would read books, sing songs, cuddle, nap (maybe even at the same time), and let’s be honest–watch a lot of Netflix.

Day One: Evan did not sleep at all without needing to be held that first night before Alex went back to work. I assured him we would be fine all night so he could get a good, solid night’s rest. I hadn’t slept more than an hour and a half when he left for work that day, but I was still thriving. I cleaned, kept up with dishes, did laundry, stuck to Evan’s strict feeding and medication schedule, did his G tube dressing changes, and kept him happy all day. When Alex got home that night I think we were dancing to “Brown Eyed Girl” in the living room. It was everything I had ever dreamed. I was exhausted, but I was doing it. I was actually getting to be a full-time mom. So much of our life up to this point felt like part-time parenting which is excruciatingly painful–ask any NICU parent. This simple joy of being with my baby and being all he needed was incredible.

Cuddling whenever we want!

Day Two: Things fall apart. Evan had been congested the day before, and I wasn’t able to get much of anything with the bulb syringe or the electric snot sucker we bought. I called the pediatrician and they said to keep an eye on it and call back the following day if he seemed worse. We had gotten an Owlet Sock for him at one of our baby showers. For peace of mind and to make the transition from constant monitoring easier, we kept it on him all but four hours a day (when it had to be on the charger). It doesn’t alarm like the monitors in the hospital. It won’t go off until the baby’s oxygen saturation reads 79% or lower (normal is in the 90s- preferably the high 90s). Evan’s went off five times by 1PM that day. Something wasn’t right. He was pale and lethargic. He needed to be stimulated to bring his oxygen back up. I took his temperature. 100.5. I knew what this meant, but I wanted it to be wrong so badly. So I called the pediatrician’s office as a last ditch effort to be told something different from what my gut knew to be true–I had to take him to the emergency room.

We lived 40 minutes from the pediatric ER. I couldn’t drive with him so unstable in the back seat this whole way. I called everyone I knew who worked in the medical field to come drive with me to take him in. I was on my last person, and if she didn’t pick up or couldn’t come quickly, I would have to call 911. This was NOT the stay at home mom life I signed up for.

Amy was able to ride with me. While I waited for her to come, I packed up everything I could think of that we might need if we got admitted which seemed highly likely to me. I let Alex know what was going on and told him to meet us there after work. When we got to the ER, Evan’s temperature had spiked to 102.5 and his oxygen saturation was 77%. He was dusky looking at best and barely moving or opening his eyes. They got him on oxygen immediately and waited for the pediatric team to decide if he needed to be in the PICU or regular peds floor. This would be the first of many ER visits for us over the next few months.

When Alex arrived, Amy left, and I let myself cry. The worst part of Evan being sick was that I knew how it happened. I caught a cold the week before and did EVERYTHING possible to keep him from germs aside from moving into a hotel. I washed my hands a thousand times a day, used hand sanitizer constantly, wore a surgical mask so I couldn’t breathe on or near him, limited my contact with him when Alex was home, slept separately from him when possible— the works. But it was inevitable. I blamed myself for us being in this situation. For only making it 18 days out of the hospital before being right back in it.

We got admitted that evening and spent the next six days waiting for Evan to recover and be able to breathe consistently without oxygen. This is what happens when a NICU baby gets a simple cold.

Sick little boy.
Exhausted but so glad to be able to spend the night with Evan in the hospital.

In the midst of Evan recovering from this cold, he also had some other mishaps. He screamed without stopping all night every night that we were there. It was his pain cry (which is actually his only true cry–everything else is just fussing). Eventually one of his doctors figured out that with the malformations in his brain, it was likely that he was having phantom nerve pain, so she prescribed a medication to alleviate this pain. It took a few days to kick in, but it worked! Evan also had his first G-tube button change while we were there. Not scheduled. At 3am one night, the balloon that keeps his button in place busted and his G-tube came out leaking stomach contents all over him and his bed. We had to wait forever for surgery to come fix it. It was miserable, but his night nurse stayed with me for three hours while Evan screamed in both our faces (we love you Loganne). Surgery also discovered that Evan had bilateral inguinal hernias that would need to be surgically repaired as soon as possible. Great….another surgery. Just what we wanted to hear.

Sweet, super pregnant Amber rocking our boy so I could just lie down for a few minutes.

During our stay, I went 62 hours in a row without sleep. Getting to stay the night with Evan was new for us since he had only ever been in the NICU before. It was wonderful but also so hard. Evan’s palliative care doctor had to get Alex to kick me out to go home and sleep. We were lucky enough to have Amber get pulled down to the PEDS floor while we were there, and we more or less demanded to have her as his nurse. Our NICU family was still taking care of us. Several of his nurses, doctors, and therapists came in to see him and check on us while we were there. We also started building our PEDS family that week. The nurses we had that week would become our regulars in our future PEDS visits.

My guys.

Evan was finally weened completely off the oxygen again and was ready to go home with follow up appointments scheduled to plan out his hernia surgery. This discharge was a lot happier than the last. We had gotten used to home and wanted to be back there.

HOME.

It is crazy to think about how chaotic that week was. Anyone who saw me could tell you I was a mess. I feel like I was “that” mom on the PEDS floor who nurses dreaded because I was so strict about Evan’s schedule. Even though I was a disaster, I am thankful for that admission because it helped me find my voice in advocating for Evan’s needs outside of the NICU. When we were on the 14th floor, I often didn’t have to advocate for him because he had a team of dedicated nurses who knew him just as well if not better than we did and loved him so much. They did it for us. Now we were in new, uncharted waters. The 11th floor was just different. Being outpatient was different. All of it is good, but we needed to get used to a new normal (again). I’m happy (and maybe a little sad) to say that we now have a sense of normal and routine in being on the PEDS floor or in going to over a dozen doctor and therapy appointments a month with Evan.

For me, being a stay at home mom has been a lot of being a stay at hospital mom. This was just the first of many admissions we would have in the months that followed. But I wouldn’t trade it. I am certain that God chose me specifically to be Evan’s mom, and I thank Him every day for that undeserved blessing.